2011 College Composition Courses

All First-Year students enroll in a section of CC110, a topic-based college writing course. Below are the descriptions of the course topics for 2011.

CC110—01 Places We Call Home
Hannah Baker-Siroty T/Th 10:00- 11:15 Lab W 4:00-6:00
In this course we will examine the locations that define our past, present and future. We will think critically and write about these places, while examining the ways in which writers are shaped, in part, by location (internal and external). Through writing and examining the impact of where we come from, we will discover the influence of place on our identities and better understand the meaning of place in life and writing. This class also provides a lab component for concentrated skill development in critical reading and writing skills.

CC110-02 Places We Call Home
Pam Palmer T/Th 8:30-9:45 Lab 4:00-6:00
In this course we will examine the locations that define our past, present and future. We will think critically and write about these places, while examining the ways in which writers are shaped, in part, by location (internal and external). Through writing and examining the impact of where we come from, we will discover the influence of place on our identities and better understand the meaning of place in life and writing. This class also provides a lab component for concentrated skill development in critical reading and writing skills.

CC110-03 Pop Culture in America
Anne Champion T/Th 2:30-3:45
American culture has been identified most readily with the popular arts--music, film, literature, dance, radio, television, etc. It would be difficult to overstate the vitality of these forms in America or their importance in the lives of the people. We currently live in a generation comprised of a mass audience offered with large quantities of cheap entertainment that overwhelms the cultural landscape and dominates it in a way that produces both fragmentation and cohesion among its consumers. Even so, the value and the implications of American popular culture have been, and continue to be, a matter of intense debate and disagreement. But it seems unlikely that anyone could have an understanding of American culture or, for that matter, American identity, without an understanding of the role that popular culture plays in our history. Reading and writing responses to these cultural phenomena will allow students to develop a critical eye with which to “read” American culture.

CC110-04 The Write Space: How Place and Identity Write Our Lives
Hannah Baker-Siroty T/Th 11:30- 12:45
In this course we will examine the locations that define our past, present and future. We will think critically and write about these places, while examining the ways in which writers are shaped, in part, by location. Through writing and examining the impact of where we come from, we will discover the influence of place on our identities and better understand the meaning of place in life and writing.

CC110-05 The Search for Meaning; Self, Spirit, and Society
(This course is open only to students who enroll in FYS 101-02, Make and Believe: We are the Stories we Tell, or FYS 101-03, Self Authorship)
Lisa Breger T/Th11:30-12:45
In this course, we will explore classic themes in spirituality and how they relate to our own lives, our sense of self, and our journeys to find our place in the world. We will learn the skills of critical reflection in order to examine our experience and perceptions through multiple viewpoints and by attending to the various ways in which our spirits are deepened through art, nature, music, poetry, dance, and service. In this course, we will use writing and discussion as vehicles to better know ourselves, to discover how we know what we know, to expand our frame of reference, and to connect with others about the human experience.

CC110-06 Pop Culture in America
Anne Champion T/Th 1:00-2:15
American culture has been identified most readily with the popular arts--music, film, literature, dance, radio, television, etc. It would be difficult to overstate the vitality of these forms in America or their importance in the lives of the people. We currently live in a generation comprised of a mass audience offered with large quantities of cheap entertainment that overwhelms the cultural landscape and dominates it in a way that produces both fragmentation and cohesion among its consumers. Even so, the value and the implications of American popular culture have been, and continue to be, a matter of intense debate and disagreement. But it seems unlikely that anyone could have an understanding of American culture or, for that matter, American identity, without an understanding of the role that popular culture plays in our history. Reading and writing responses to these cultural phenomena will allow students to develop a critical eye with which to “read” American culture.

CC110-07 Whooping & Singing for Survival
(This course is open only to students who enroll in FYS 101-01 )
Jervette Ward M/W 1:00-2:15
In this course, students write about the sermons, speeches, and songs that have created the African American religious canon. Through reading, listening, and watching African American sermons and religious songs, students develop skills to demonstrate their ability to express both written and oral ideas clearly and effectively for different purposes and audiences.

CC110-08 CC 110 Seeing, Writing, and Creativity
William Stargard M/W 1:00- 2:15
In this course students write about visual images, e.g. photographs, paintings, sculptures, advertisements, and cartoons. Students develop skills in seeing as well as writing about what they and others see. Creativity, both in terms of the making of the visual image as well as the writing about it, is explored in this course.