Disability Services

Pine Manor College takes pride in its dedication to helping a diverse student body achieve their goals in a postsecondary setting and beyond. Disability services strives to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities by working with one student at a time to ensure both a smooth transition from high school as well as guide them through their college experience.

Pine Manor College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations and support to students with disabilities to help them reach their full academic and professional potential. The Disability Specialist advocates for students with disabilities while ensuring equal access to PMC’s programs and courses.

In accordance with the state and federal laws outlined in the ADAA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, students with documented learning, physical, and psychiatric disabilities may be eligible for accommodations.

Students requiring testing, classroom, or residence hall accommodations must complete and intake interview and provide documentation to the Disability Specialist in the Learning Resource Center. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Donna DeFuria at ddefuria@pmc.edu or 617-731-7178.

Introduction

Disability Services at Pine Manor College is committed to serving students with disabilities. PMC ensures that all students have equal access to academic programs and courses, as well as the opportunity to live comfortably on campus.

Students with documented disabilities should plan to meet with the Disability Specialist prior to the beginning of each semester. Following an intake interview and review of documentation, students will be provided a letter outlining their specific accommodations. These accommodations are reasonable and will ensure equal access to PMC’s curriculum.

To be considered eligible for reasonable accommodations through disability services, a student must meet the following criteria:

  1. Have a documented disability
  2. Apply and be accepted for admission to Pine Manor College through the standard admission’s process.
  3. Schedule a meeting with the Disability Specialist, Donna DeFuria, to review needs and advocate for accommodations.

Confidentiality

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 protects the confidentiality of student medical and disability records. Students with disabilities are ensured that written paperwork and documentation will be kept confidential and shared only with relevant parties. Disability-related information is kept in separate files with access limited to the disability specialist. FERPA protects theses files from being shared (without the student’s permission) with faculty, administrators, other students, etc.

A note to faculty:
Disability-related documentation should be submitted to Disability Specialist. If a student provides you with personal records or paperwork, please refer him or her to Donna DeFuria in the LRC.

Assistive Technology

In accordance with the Rehabilitation Act Regulations, postsecondary education establishments are required to provide students with disabilities with auxiliary aids. Auxiliary aids include audio books, recorded lectures, exchange of written notes, magnification software, large print materials, and any other accommodations that are considered reasonable and do not place an undue financial burden on the postsecondary institution.

Relevant Laws

A student with a disability is entitled to equal access to college programs and services. The laws outlined in the Americans with Disability Amendments Act (2008) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 protect students with disabilities in the post-secondary education setting.

The Americans with Disability Amendments Act (2008), as it applies to public entities, states: Section 12132. Discrimination “Subject to the provisions of this subchapter, no qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any such entity.”

The ADA defines a person with a disability as “an individual who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such impairment; or is regarded as having such an impairment.” Major life activities include reading, learning, writing, performing math calculations, walking, seeing, hearing, and speaking.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Section 504, 29 U.S.C. §794, states: No otherwise qualified individual with a disability in the United States shall, solely by reason of her or his disability be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.