Faculty Symposium Series

Upcoming Presentations

A schedule of Fall 2014 presentations will be published here in September.
Join us again in the Fall.

Previous Presentations


 

Professor Hannah Baker-Siroty, "Odd of the Ordinary"

April 25, 2014

Professor Hannah Baker-Siroty has degrees from The University of Wisconsin, Madison and Sarah Lawrence College. She has been awarded fellowships from The Vermont Studio Center and The Writers' Room of Boston. Her poetry has appeared in Best New Poets 2012, Broad!, Cactus Heart, Each Moment a Mountain, and Lumina, among other places. Prof. Baker-Siroty discussed her poetry from her collection Odd of the Ordinary and her newer poems about Vice Presidents of the United States, and shared her thoughts about her writing process.



 

Cindy Miller, Ph.D., “Vernacular Museums: From the ‘Everyman’ to the ‘Everyday’”

March 28, 2014

Professor Miller's research centers around the emergence and persistence of vernacular museums, which showcase “ethnographies of the everyday” – ranging from the social and cultural impact of local figures or groups to everyday lifeways – often in less formal locations, and their roles in constructing community. Numerous examples will be visually illustrated and analyzed, with an eye toward understanding their voice in representation and the creation and dissemination of local knowledge. These small museums, spearheaded by individuals and community groups, have increasingly emerged across the United States, as individuals seek a voice in shaping the creation of our understanding of history and culture.


 

Kathi Aguero, read from her new book, "After That”

March 21, 2014 

Kathleen Aguero has published five collections of poetry: Daughter Of, The Real Weather, Thirsty Day, Investigations, a collection of poems inspired by Nancy Drew, and the most recent After That. Her work has appeared in numerous literary journals, including Poetry magazine, Massachusetts Review, and the Cincinnati Review. She is also co-editor of three collections of multicultural literature: A Gift of Tongues, An Ear to the Ground, and Daily Fare. Her creative nonfiction essay, “Marriage Koan,” appears in the anthology Why I’m Still Married. Recipient of a Massachusetts Fellowship in Poetry and a fellowship to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Kathi also was awarded a writing grant from the Elgin/Cox Trust. She has taught at the Writers’ Center at the Chautauqua Institute in upstate New York, the NY State Young Writers' Program at Skidmore, as well as in the Poets in the Schools Programs of New Hampshire and Massachusetts. In 2004, she held the position of Visiting Research Associate at the Brandeis University Women’s Studies Research Center in Waltham, Massachusetts. In addition to teaching in the Solstice MFA program, Kathi teaches for “Changing Lives Through Literature,” an alternative sentencing program based on the power of books to change lives through reading and group discussion. She is a consulting editor in poetry for Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. Visit www.kathleenaguero.com


 

Colleen Krieser & Susan Bear, “NIH Grant: Procuring Outside Funding for Scholarship and Curriculum Development”

February 28, 2014

Prof. Colleen Krieser and Prof. Susan Bear presented their work on the BUILD grant. Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD), is an initiative by the National Institute of Health (NIH) aimed to enhance diversity in the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences research workforce.
The NIH's Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) states: "...BUILD awards are intended to support the design and implementation of innovative programs, strategies and approaches to transform undergraduate research training and mentorship."

The Biology Department at Pine Manor College will be submitting the grant proposal to the NIH under the BUILD initiative this spring. 


 

Colleen Krieser, “Using C. elegans as a Model System Both in Research and Teaching”

February 14, 2014

Assistant Professor of Biology, Colleen Krieser, reported on the research she conducted during her sabbatical on the c. elegans which is a roundworm and the only organism to have its connectome (its neural "wiring diagram") completed. It is a useful tool that can be translated to human genetic research and that has implications in the treatment and cure of various neurological diseases such as Lou Gehrigs Disease and ALS.

In her presentation Prof. Kreisar laid out the purpose of her Sabbatical which included mastering the use of c. elegans in research; testing different enzymes to see if they had a measurable effect; and lastly, designing ways to take the research back to her classroom at Pine Manor College. To that end, Prof. Kreiser not only showed how critical and fundamental her research is, but also demonstrated how it will be used to teach students and prepare them to take their place in meaningful bench research positions.





                     


For questions or comments about the 
Faculty Symposium Series, please contact 
William Stargard, Ph.D., 
Assistant Dean of Faculty Development 
& Teaching Excellence, 
and Professor of Art History
email: wstargard@pmc.edu  
office: 617-731-7070