Publishing Panel, July 2014

What do editors look for in a manuscript? That question and more will be answered by our Panel of Editors, including Barry Harbaugh, fiction editor at HarperCollins; Alexis Rizzuto, nonfiction editor at Beacon Press; Carey Salerno, Executive Director of Alice James Books; Carter Hasegawa, a YA fiction editor at Candlewick Press; and Lee Hope, Executive Editor of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. Our moderator will be the Solstice MFA Program’s Associate Director, Tanya Whiton. This class is open to all Solstice students and graduates.

FICTION


© Russell Harbaugh

Barry Harbaugh is an editor at Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins publishers. A native of Southern Indiana, he previously worked (not always for pay) at Zoetrope: All-Story, The Paris Review, Harper’sConde Nast Portfolio, Wesselman’s super market, and the box office of the Signature Theater. He has fact-checked articles by Michael Lewis and Denis Johnson and books by Ken Auletta and Vicky Ward, and published his own writing in Slate, Deadspin, and The New Yorker’s “Page-Turner” blog, among other venues. His favorite writer is either Michel de Montaigne, Robinson Jeffers, Derek Walcott, Bernard Malamud, or Vladimir Nabokov. He hasn’t decided. In the Zadie Smith debate between Joseph O'Neil and Tom McCarthy (and the future of the novel), he sides with McCarthy, but likes that sentence from Netherland about the “molten progress” of a Times Square billboard. Books he’s edited at Harper include The Kept by James Scott, Ride Around Shining by Chris Leslie-Hynan, How to be Black by Baratunde Thurston, Very Recent History by Choire Sicha and, with his mentor David Hirshey, Slow Getting Up by Nate Jackson, Lost Girls by Bob Kolker, Dr. J by Julius Erving with Karl Taro Greenfeld, Cycle of Lies by Juliet Macur, Bottom of the 33rd (winner of a PEN award) by Dan Barry and The Whore of Akron by Scott Raab.

WRITING FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS


© CH 

Carter Hasegawa, assistant editor at Candlewick Press, came to children’s publishing in a roundabout way. After a decade of working in grocery, followed by a two-year stint in textbook publishing, he left everything behind to follow his passion for children’s books and earned his MA in Children’s Literature from Simmons College. Since 2008, he’s been a children’s bookseller at various independent bookstores in Seattle and in Cambridge, which he still continues to do part-time when not at Candlewick. Some of his favorite, non-Candlewick books include: The Notorious Benedict Arnold, Jellicoe Road, Eleanor & Park, Ready Player One, Three Times Lucky, and many, MANY others. Basically anything that has a great voice, is a good story, and is “unputdownable.”

CREATIVE NONFICTION


© PJ Tierney

Alexis Rizzuto, editor, received her MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Emerson College, where her work won the DuPrey Award. She has taught creative nonfiction at Cazenovia College, Syracuse University, and Boston’s Grub Street Inc. Alexis started in the publishing business at the Kneerim & Williams literary agency, then moved to the editorial side at Da Capo Press and currently works at Beacon Press where she acquires on the topics of environment and education. Recent titles include Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, Falling Into Place: An Intimate Geography of Home, and Into Great Silence: A Memoir of Discovery and Loss among Vanishing Orcas. And Richard Hoffman’s forthcoming memoir, Love & Fury.

POETRY


© UMaineENG

Carey Salerno is the executive director of Alice James Books. She has an MFA in poetry from New England College. Her first book, Shelter, was published by Alice James Books in 2009. She is the editor, along with Anne Marie Macari, of the anthology Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books (Alice James Books 2013). Salerno teaches for the BFA program at the University of Maine at Farmington. Her poems have appeared in various journals in print and online.

DIGITAL PUBLISHING (Online Journal & eBooks)


© Bill Betcher

Lee Hope is the recipient of the Theodore Goodman Award for Fiction, a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship, and a Maine Arts Commission Fellowship for Fiction. She has published stories in numerous literary journals and magazines, including American Fiction, Witness, The New Virginia Review, The North American Review, Beloit Fiction Journal, and High Plains Literary Review. Her short story “Recreational Biting” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She founded a low-residency MFA program, and played an instrumental role in the creation of Pine Manor’s MFA program. For 10 years she was the director of a national writers’ conference, and she has taught creative writing at various universities for the past 19 years. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Solstice Writers’ Institute, a nonprofit organization in the service of creative writers, and is Executive Editor of the organization’s literary magazine, Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. She also serves on the MFA Advisory Board of Pine Manor College. She is in the process of completing a novel.