Communication Courses

CO 101
Public Speaking
Students improve their ability to communicate through the composition and delivery of seven original speeches. Special attention is given to stage fright, audience analysis, organizing and developing content, and delivery.

CO 120
Introduction to Media Production
An introductory course in the theory, aesthetics, and application of electronic media. Digital media including video, audio, and computer-based applications are covered as well as the stages of production for digital video, audio, desktop, and web-based design. The goal is to achieve understanding of the aesthetics of digital based content and experience the many applications for new digital technology.

CO 220
Concepts in Media Literacy
Concepts of Media Literacy provides a broad introduction to theories and research describing the effectiveness and ethics of mainstream media messages, and what might be gained by a more nuanced understanding of how messages are created. Classes examine topics such as the psychology of visual interpretation, the uses and effects of various production variables (camera angle, montage, editing, etc.), genre functions and conventions in entertainment media, tools and processes of creating film and digital media, and viewers’ “resistance” to media effects. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement.
Recommended for students who expect to take video production, photography, or visual design courses later

CO 225
Multimedia Production
This course gives students hands-on instruction in how to use digital media tools to produce online stories. Students will learn key concepts and design principles in video and audio production, and video and image editing. Students will develop a website that presents a digital multimedia story, using slideshows, videos and animations. Students will learn how to capture engaging photo & video footage to create an effective multimedia experience in post-production.

CO 240
Media Writing
This course is an introduction to the variety of writing styles and formats currently used in print and electronic media today, including newspapers, magazines, advertising, public relations, radio, and TV. Students will analyze print and electronic media writing and create a portfolio of their own writing that meets industry standards. Special emphasis will be given to print and electronic journalism, advertising, and public relations copywriting, and writing for the World Wide Web. This is a required course for all Communication majors and is also recommended for English majors, Business majors, and students in other majors who would like to improve their writing skills and learn about the media industry.
Prerequisite: CC 110, completed or taken concurrently.

CO 241
Introduction to Social Media
This course will introduce students to the contexts and forms of social media. What are social media, who uses them, who gains from them, and how are they transforming the media landscape and the way we inhabit the world? Students will become familiar with a range of social media tools, analyze and discuss their uses and implications. They will have the opportunity to explore both theory and practice of social media through writing assignments, applied tasks, and a course project.

CO 255/355
Special Topics: New Media

Special Topics in New Media explores specific issues connected in emerging communication technologies. The focus of the course will change depending on the semester offered, though sample topics of study may include social networking, game studies, or the open source and free culture movements. Materials include critical study of media products, professional practices, and the cultural and economic contexts of technological change. This course can be taken for credit multiple times as long as it features a different focus each time, and can be taken at the 300 level with instructor permission, requiring an additional project or projects. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement. Offered selectively.
Prerequisites: For 200-level: CC 112 or permission. For 300-level: CC 112 and CO 102, or permission.

CO 257/357
Special Topics: Journalism

Special Topics in Journalism addresses topics that reflect the constantly evolving nature of this industry. The subject matter of the course will change from semester to semester based on what is happening in journalism at that time. Some sample areas of study include blogging, Web journalism, the death of newspapers and ethical issues facing electronic media journalists. Classes will involve lectures, group presentations, in-class writing assignments, and class discussions of case studies and issues currently facing journalists. This course can be taken for credit multiple times as long as it features a different focus each time, and can be taken at the 300 level with instructor permission, requiring an additional project or projects. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement. Offered selectively. Prerequisites: For 200-level: CC 112 or permission. For 300-level: CC 112 & CO 102, or permission.
Recommended, but not required: EN209

CO 258/358
Special Topics: Advertising and Public Relations

Topics in Advertising & PR focuses on topics that relate directly to current industry practices and tackles issues such as marketing in a media-driven world, writing the right pitch, and coming up with copy that sells. The course will include case studies, hands-on experience and the production of a professional project. Classes will involve lectures, group presentations, in-class writing assignments, and class discussions of case studies and issues facing the advertising and public relations industry. This course can be taken for credit multiple times as long as it features a different focus each time, and can be taken at the 300 level with instructor permission, requiring an additional project or projects. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement. Prerequisites: For 200-level: CC 112 or permission. For 300-level: CC 112 & CO 102, or permission.
One of the following is recommended, but not required: MK 221 Marketing Principles; MK 324 Advertising; CO 310 Public Relations; CO/EN350 Advertising Copywriting and Design Seminar

CO 259/359
Special Topics: Entertainment

Special Topics in Entertainment Media features rotating topics on the forms and industries of entertainment media and popular art. Topics may touch upon developments in popular music, serial television, Hollywood film, or studies of specific creative/aesthetic movements and genres (such as film noir, the graphic novel, hip hop, etc.). Materials include critical study of content as well as production and distribution processes. This course can be taken for credit multiple times as long as it features a different focus each time, and can be taken at the 300 level with instructor permission, requiring an additional project or projects. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement.
Prerequisites: For 200-level: CC 112 or permission. For 300-level: CC 112 & CO 102, or permission.

CO 261
Social Media Campaigns

The course examines the pervasive impact social media is having on our society, with specific interest in the implications and applications of social media for strategic media professionals. Focus is given to investigating the theoretical and cultural aspects of social media with an aim to toward understanding how this communication form has changed our relationship between individuals, organizations, and society.

PS/CO 267/367
Media, Law and Justice

Who determines our news? This course explores the complex relationship between media and crime, and how various media forms (television, newspapers, films, and the internet/YouTube/Facebook- hereinafter “the media”) portray deviance, crime, the police and the criminal justice system, and ultimately help shape social policy. The overall purpose of this course is to analyze crime and its images found in the media. Topics to be explored include the media’s decision to cover certain news stories and crimes, what underlying issues/biases (race, gender, age) affect this coverage, what responsibilities, if any, the media have in factually reporting crimes, and how coverage/images found in the media affect our perception of crime and justice. Students enrolling in the 300-level section will be expected to read additional materials, lead class discussions, and complete a substantial research project.
Prerequisite: SO103 preferred, permission of instructor required for PS357. Group: II or IDS

IN 295
Exploratory Internship

An exploratory-level internship that provides an introduction to a field, that links academic studies with the world of work. The student spends a minimum of 8 hours per week (96 on site work hours) for a semester on-site with a work supervisor and participates in a regularly scheduled seminar. Fall, Spring, and Summer. In certain circumstances, local summer internships may be available. Consultation with Dean of the College and the Director of Career Development is required by April 30.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the first semester of the first year and approval from the Faculty Sponsor and the Director of Career Development.

CO/ED 285
Children and the Media

Research findings, industry practices, and content of children’s media are examined to determine their impact on children. Students examine how media designed for adults affects children. The focus is on videotapes, cable and broadcast television, and film as the largest producers of children’s media. Audio recordings and children’s magazines—fast-growing segments in the children’s media marketplace—are also considered. Students read, listen, view, and discuss children’s media; develop content analysis skills; and write about the issues. Satisfies the Industry & Culture elective requirement. Offered selectively.
Group: II or IV.

CO 325
Media. Privacy, and the First Amendment

There has been a massive disruption in the media landscape with the introduction of new technologies. These technologies bring the issues of the balance of the First Amendment’s guarantee of a free press into direct conflict with the ideal of privacy that has developed since Brandeis and Warren first advocated for it in 1890. This class will explore how we came to understand our right to privacy, how that right has come into conflict with the First Amendment, how new technologies impact privacy and what that means for us now and in the future. Students will consider how they will navigate this conflict as media producers and consumers. Our discussions will be focused on leading ethical and legal controversies concerning new media tools (e.g., social networks, mobile apps, digital e-readers, wearable health sensors), practices (e.g., online tracking, behavioral advertising, automated face recognition, video surveillance), platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, and Google Maps), and other topics shaping today's privacy discourse.

CO 335
Research Methods for Media Studies

This course introduces students the variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in media studies. Topics will include the differences between qualitative and quantitative approaches and how to appropriately use them. Students will be expected to complete projects using both approaches.

CO 350
Media, Journalism, and Politics

This course examines the relationship between politics and the media. It is a relationship that has witnessed a massive change in the past decade. Now political actors must be well versed in social media as well as mass media. The course will review the relevant political communication theories and practices. This course help students develop a set of tools and skills they can use as a political communication professional or as an activist.

CO 495
Senior Internship Seminar

The Senior Internship provides the student with specialized, practical experience in a mass media working environment: radio or TV stations, cable TV companies, audio and/or production houses, newspapers, magazines, advertising agencies, or public relations firms. Students work in the field and meet once per week to discuss and analyze their experiences.
Prerequisite: Senior status.

CO 497
Senior Project

This is the capstone course for Communication majors. Working with instructor students develop a research project around a specific communication problems or issue. Students will identify a topic of interest and will conduct library research about the topic. Working with the instructor, students will explore the important literature in the area. The final project will be a substantial literature review which identifies the problem/issue, presents the pertinent literature and suggest appropriate methodologies for exploring the issue in future research. Projects produced in this seminar can be used as part of the senior portfolio presentation and as a professional portfolio to be used after graduation